Photo by Rhema, age 17, originally from Kenya

Refugee youth from Crawford High School are participating in an arts-based workshop on Food Justice that is being run by The AjA Project as part of the media collaborative, Speak City Heights. For this assignment, youth photographed their City Heights neighborhood and created a photo map illustrating the options for healthy and non-healthy foods. Youth unanimously agreed that there are many places in City Heights to get healthy, cheap food. They considered themselves to be healthy, but felt that City Heights, as a whole, is unhealthy. Their visual narratives raised the question – Do refugees have more access to healthy, cheap food than other City Heights residents?

 

Photo by Myo Ti, age 16, originally from Burma

Refugee youth from Crawford High School are participating in an arts-based workshop on Food Justice that is being run by The AjA Project as part of the media collaborative, Speak City Heights. For this assignment youth photographed their cultural food practices, illuminating the link between culture, access and education around healthy eating. Many youth from Southeast Asia described a plant-based diet that they have been able to easily continue in the United States through local community gardens and farmer’s markets. Many refugees arrive in the United States with the tools and education for healthy eating.

 

Photo by Myo Myo, age 15, originally from Burma

Refugee youth from Crawford High School are participating in an arts-based workshop on Food Justice that is being run by The AjA Project as part of the media collaborative, Speak City Heights. For this assignment, youth explored the New Roots community garden in City Heights. Their photos and stories revealed that not only do gardens help ensure access to healthy food, but also improve mental health by providing refugees with a sense of community and connection, helping to alleviate acculturation stress and depression. Youth also mentioned that only mostly refugees use the gardens and think that most people in City Heights believe that the gardens are only available for refugees.